People Planet Society Technology

There is a huge need for “change” , for “corporate excellence” , to tackle the world’s problems in a whole. But how? Absolutely NOT how we did “manage” it the last 120 years. LEAN, SixSigma, PDCA, AI, ERP, ….. all “tools” to “get on track” again. But which track ? The same? Preferably not I would say.

Excellence should be a mindset by default , and for many of us it is, in fact I cannot imagine somebody going to work in the morning saying “Let’s make as much trouble as possible” and yet…. How do we get into as much trouble as we do ? My answer is simple : Because we have poor (weak) decision making. And how is that possible? By information getting
filtered out through “subjective analyze”. In this blog I will be posting some comments on (global and local) issues, which could be a result of poor decision making, just for the sake of showing that this is a universal problem in all industries and through all categories or levels of decision takers.

Jimmy Van de Putte

Email :
Twitter : @JIMMYVDP

An idea of the global treats for the next decades :
Some further "reflections" :


22 May 2012

PV,Ex,Link : JP morgan chase, Vatican, and EU , different but the same

Mr Stiglitz, nobelprize winner economics,  wrote an article called "After Austerity".

Below some parts of the article, I underlined the parts that are important and support my vision/statements.

Companies as well as governments should deal with all the issues that provoke weak decision taking, ...ask me how and what they are, essay is in the make, presentations on "Redefining management , excellence by default, etc. can be given on request.

 Please read the entire article of Mr Stiglitz on :

NEW YORK – This year’s annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund made clear that Europe and the international community remain rudderless when it comes to economic policy. Financial leaders, from finance ministers to leaders of private financial institutions, reiterated the current mantra: the crisis countries have to get their houses in order, reduce their deficits, bring down their national debts, undertake structural reforms, and promote growth. Confidence, it was repeatedly said, needs to be restored.
It is a little precious to hear such pontifications from those who, at the helm of central banks, finance ministries, and private banks, steered the global financial system to the brink of ruinand created the ongoing mess. Worse, seldom is it explained how to square the circle. How can confidence be restored as the crisis economies plunge into recession? How can growth be revived when austerity will almost surely mean a further decrease in aggregate demand, sending output and employment even lower?.....
Europe’s single-minded focus on austerity is a result of a misdiagnosis of its problems. Greece overspent, but Spain and Ireland had fiscal surpluses and low debt-to-GDP ratios before the crisis. Giving lectures about fiscal prudence is beside the point. Taking the lectures seriously –  even adopting tight budget frameworks – can be counterproductive. Regardless of whether Europe’s problems are temporary or fundamental – the eurozone, for example, is far from an “optimal” currency area, and tax competition in a free-trade and free-migration area can erode a viable state – austerity will make matters worse.........
So many economies are vulnerable to natural disasters – earthquakes, floods, typhoons, hurricanes, tsunamis – that adding a man-made disaster is all the more tragic. But that is what Europe is doing. Indeed, its leaders’ willful ignorance of the lessons of the past is criminal.
The pain that Europe, especially its poor and young, is suffering is unnecessary. Fortunately, there is an alternative. But delay in grasping it will be very costly, and Europe is running out of time.

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